muay thai, thaiboxing

Saenchai – Muay thai legend

Friday I met with Saenchai (Kotmuay Muaythaigym) to do a short interview and to greet him welcome to Ireland. Being a friend of my trainer in Denmark KruToy, I’ve met Saenchai around the world with KruToy, so it felt natural and respectful to meet him here.

Now before I get to the point of todays blog, let m just say one thing! I should have scheduled the meeting til after the weigh-in, as it was clear that Saenchai was both little tired from travelling (from Thailand to Ireland) and probably also quite famished! (I know, I would be). But he was very kind and took some time to sit down with me, below you can see the second (and best part of the interview).

 

Now to the point! About a week ago, I posted a question on the Fight Club page on Facebook, asking the fight fans who their favorite Nak Muay (Thai boxer) is. While a lot got it mixed up with K-1 and answered Badr Hari, most people who picked a thai boxer, answered Buakaw or recently deceased (and way to early!!) Ramon Dekkers.

While I understand both answers: Buakaw has the looks of a living greek (Thai) God and the fierceness of a lion in the ring, and Ramon Dekkers can easily be called the best european thaiboxer ever – then I still have to disagree with most of the fans who answered the questions, cause my all time favorite fighter will without any doubt be Saenchai.

I know this is a very subjective question – up with favorite football teams etc. But, for me Saenchai is the essens of the beauty and complexity of muay thai – and he is a showman. At least when he fights foreigners!
Seeing Saenchai fight, is seeing so many aspects and ‘forgotten’ weapons of muay thai in action. It’s not just the raw power, explossive and forceful techniques many other fighters posses. Saenchai brings a deeper meaning of Muay Thai to his fights – at least thats how I see them. And if real life is to be compared to a movie, Saenchai would be Ong Bak – or a similar story of a fighter with the heart in the right place – humble, yet proud. Strong, fierce – yet gentle and ‘like water’ – as Bruce Lee would have said.

As a muay thai practitioner (means I train, teach and fight – or fought) and a somewhat of a fight connoisseur, Saenchai has always had a special place in my heart. Even before I met him – just from watching him fight, unlocks emotions and worlds of understanding that fighting as a sport is much more than sport, expressions of power and deep consequence of competitiveness.
For some people like Saenchai, the art of fighting is the very expression of the human being.

It’s in a place where everything is meant to be, no movement unnecessary. No energy wasted – it’s a perfect composition, and I would implore everyone – whether you like fight sport or not, to see Saenchai fight, if you have the opportunity.
He is a true living legend, and I’m sure history will agree with me. Aside from all the others great and impressive fighters – Saenchai stands out as a one in a million.

Liam, Saenchai & me

Liam, Saenchai & me

Ps. For those who saw Saenchai fight in Cork, Ireland yesterday (saturday 9th march), it’s obvious that he is a show man as well, the way he moved the crowd – and btw. what a crowd!! The Neptune stadium was boiling, when he was fighting!
And if you haven’t seen him before, you might even think, that he was in trouble from time to time. But google/ youtube some of his others fights against foreigners, and you will see, he always lets them into the fight – just a bit. Just to give the audience their money worth and often a full 5round fight. Liam Harrison and Fabio Pinca as exceptions – from his own mouth, two very powerful and strong opponents.

Pps. If you’re in Thailand in beginning of April – I think he said April 7th or 9th. Saenchai is figthing in Lumpini against the best thai opposition there is right now: Singdam. (They are 1-1). Go see the fight!! That would be a real fight!!

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Sport, training

Broken but mending

So I had a close encounter with the Irish health system last friday. After two months of swelling and pain in my finger, a doctors visit that led to no-where, I was ready for the A&E test (Accidents & Emergency).
Now, while my finger had gone from an emergency to an accident, it was still severe – being fat & painful. Never the less, CUH (Cork University Hospital) had me waiting for nearly 6 hours for an X-ray.
Only to be told by a severly overweight doctor (who sounded like Apu from Simpsons): ‘If you come two months ago, you would not have this problem’.

I mean: WTF!!%¤#”” No shit Sherlock! I waited 6 hours for that??

Yes I did, and I’m paying 100 euro for it too – courtesy The A&E staff at CUH & The Irish Health Care system.

This is great, so I thought I should wait around a bit more. Just short of three hours waiting the next day, and I do get to see a physiotherapist at the ‘Broken bone clinic’. She is actually listening to me, and I’m told my finger is indeed broken (clean-cut almost), but it’s mending. However, I shouldn’t punch anything – or lift anything heavy.
(So much for slamming the fat doctor and GnP him 😉 )

Anyway, It’s fair to say she restored a bit of my faith in health professionals – and I’m really trying to comply with her perscriptions. No boxing with the right hand – or heavy lifting.

Also mending this week is my relationship with the PR Company in London. Not sure if they just got better at their job, or if it’s due to my friend from Holland /Glory organisation, but I did receive a very informative and almost friendly mail this morning. Which Im very happy for. I hope this will be a great event – and besides watching some of the worlds best K-1 fighters, I also get to see a long lost friend. And with a hopefully friendly PR company to help/ provide me with schedules etc. It can only be a great weekend!

Training schedule since hospital visit:

Saturday: Muay Thai – 1rd of pads (just kicks) + 18 rds of bag work (kicks, Knees, elbows & left hand)
Sunday: 5K easy run/jog
Monday:
Modified S&C Week 3 programe:

Snatch 4x 4 – 20kg
Goodmornings 4x 4 – 40 kg
Squats 4×4 – 50kg

Rest of the week will probably look like this. No heavy weights – squats & goodmornings and left hand work!

Training schedule before hospital was a lot of classes + 2 weeks of S &C program.

I’m doing a free seminar this saturday (march 9th) in RB Fitness. If you’re an Irish female in Cork, come and join!
Also Saenchai – worlds best p4p fighter is in Cork. He’s a friend of my trainer KruToy and I hope, I’ll have an interview with him this weekend!

the gathering muay thai

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Blogging, Expat, West Cork

Ireland vs Denmark IV

It’s VS time again!!
-Warning sarcasm and a rough tone might read at first, hopefully the love and humor will shine through with the after thought.

Weather! A condition that’s been on my mind lately (after 2 weeks of non-stop rain!!)

Before I moved from Copenhagen, I thought Denmark had the worst weather ever! After living in Ireland for more than a year, I can truthfully state I was wrong!! Nothing beats the irish weather in terms of bad, worse and worst. The sky over West Cork some days lie above us as a big, fat, grey blanket. And I mean it’s all grey!! Not a ray of sunshine or a glimpse of blue sky. It’s not even ‘cute, bubbly white ala cotton balls skies, it’s grey ‘after the nuclear-polution-post-apocalypse-sky’. After a few days with this, it’s easy to understand the level of drinking here. If you’re not depressed by economy, you get let down by the weather.

And to help the feeling of bad – the houses here seems really bad when it comes to insulation. For some reason – unknown to me – the irish, who have lived in these sh***y conditions for centuries, have not taken upon themselves to learn how to build insulation into their houses. Example: The house I live in takes a couple of hours to heat up, but only one hour to return to it’s frostbox-like state.

No real winner: Both countries are shit when it comes to the weather. However Denmark getting +1 for having nice, warm, insulated houses in the winter, and the Irish getting a +1 for handling their lousy weather with dignity. I’m not sure, I could have handled growing up here.

irish weather

Public Transport: Now this one is tricky.
Time table service: In Copenhagen where I lived, busses ran on time, every day – all day (and in all sorts of weather). If late, it wouldn’t be more than a minute or two.  And the popular routes would be running every 5-8 minute in rush hours.

In Cork, Ireland where I live now, busses seems to run, whenever they feel like it. Several times a month I’d be waiting for a bus that never shows, and by frequency of busses here, we’re talking at least 20 minutes more waiting in the freaking cold (see above). Then of course there is the bus to my new work, which only make a stop on my road 5 times a day. Rest of the times, it just passes by!! (Yes it’s true!!)

Price: Public transport prices are insane in Copenhagen. I think I paid around 26dkr for a ticket (almost 4 euro). On the other hand, you can use the same ticket for 1hour within the same city zone. In Ireland tickets are 1.80euro (12dkr), but if you’re changing busses, you need to buy a new.

Face to face service: In general – Irish bus drivers are more easy going. Probably because they have nicer passengers as well. Here it’s costume to say ‘Thank you’ to the driver when you leave the bus (at the front door, cause there’s no backdoor). In Copenhagen I’ve heard of bus drivers who got spat upon when asking for ticket money.

Winner: Despite nicer drivers, I do prefer busses/ trains which runs on time and more often than 5 times during a day!! Ireland, you should take note of Denmark’s way with public transport!

 

Blueberries muffins: Hands down, beside Starbucks – Dunnes make the best tasting blueberries muffins. Denmark could definitely need a Dunnes stores! (but this will be for next VS blog).

 

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40 day Lent challenge, Sport, training

Sunday run in sunny Cork

The ‘misplaced’ challenge day

Had a wonderful run today – first real day of spring, nothing like celebrating running in the sun. Feel the warmth on my skin and enjoy, that I for once wasn’t cold the first 10 minutes, and could even run in my tank top. Legs also felt good and even the hills didn’t kill me or slowed me down much.

Just so very, very nice – and I didn’t get lost, despite I tried a new way, I haven’t walked/ ran before.

Today according to map on walkjogrun.net:
4.66 miles (7.7k) – time was around 38 min. Felt like a very short run, and yet was happy when I came back to the house. Took a glass of water and sat out on the curve when I came back. Soaking up the sun. I’m still quite convinced, that I was born to live somewhere warm. And before anyone thinks anything – no Korea is not particular warm. Country has four seasons, just like Denmark.

Probably last outdoor run in my very old Asics. Thanks friends - you've served well

Anyway, very happy with my choice of challenge  – tomorrow is a new day, and it’s soon time to get my goals for the ’40 days Lent Challenge’ down. 2 more weeks to go – 2 more weeks to easter eggs.

Liam came home around lunch time and we went into Cork for lunch. Weather was so nice, so we decided to buy some food in Mark & Spencer and find a place outside to eat. I got this ‘Make you fuller longer’ king prawn/ beans/ wild rice/ veg + irresistible coriander and lime dressing, salad’. Which is probably one of the best ‘store bought’ salad I’ve ever tasted. But didn’t make me fuller, longer. Already in the car on our way home, I was munching in crisp.

I got a new gym bag for my birthday. Very happy! Will break it in tomorrow 🙂

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Expat

Ireland vs Denmark II

It’s time again for another Ireland vs Denmark

Ireland vs Denmark II

1. Traffic in Denmark seems to consists of Idioter (Idiots), narrøve (fool asses) and halv hjerner (half brainer) – and of course death-defying taxi drivers in Copenhagen, who stop for no-one and nothing.
Traffic in Cork (city much like Århus)/ Ireland seems to be relatively free of honking, stressed out road rages.. and yet, a few retards, eigits and f***** find their ways to the irish roads as well.

2. Danish houses (private and public)  are warm in the winter season. Irish are not (supermarkets excepted)!

3. Danish 24/7 supermarkets (Døgn Netto) close at 22.00/ 10pm – Irish stays open 24/7 (Tesco 24 hours)

4. In Denmark Handball is perceived as a very physical sport, where you can get hurt! The danes have clearly not watched an Irish rugby match

Rugby - a very physical sport

5. Danish Pastry in Ireland have nothing to do with ‘Wienerbrød’ (danish pastry in Denmark). No comparison what so ever – and that actually goes from countries all over the world. No one makes te-birkes as the danish baker!

6. In Ireland theres rabbits and hares on the fields. In Denmark there’s not.

7. Orange juice in Irish is pronounced Arrrrrrnge juce… which is why, I had to ask Liam several times, what he asked for. (Btw. West Cork accent is in general hard for my danish/ multiworld ears)

8. A rainbow is seldom spotted in rainful Denmark. In rainful Ireland, we sometimes see two at the same time.

And a few personals:

9. My life in Ireland doesn’t have a tv – my life in Denmark had. I don’t really miss it!!

10. All my friends are in Denmark, which is why Ireland sometimes feels a little extra cold and lonely!

Tebirkes - the danish love on a brunch table

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